Hang 10... or as they now say...hit the lip!

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Topic Title: fish from the lagoon
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Created On: 11/07/2016 04:29 PM
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 11/07/2016 04:29 PM
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WG

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edible these days?
 11/07/2016 06:13 PM
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Burry

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i'm not ready yet!
closer to the inlet where the tidal flush happens..ok!

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 11/07/2016 06:57 PM
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TallPaul

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Agree^^^..catch and release these days.

 11/08/2016 02:42 PM
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stokedpanda

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I dont think its any less safe than it ever has been

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 11/10/2016 06:44 AM
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tom

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yes, the only restriction I'm aware of is puffers

mercury caution still applies

http://www.floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/prevention/healthy-weight/nutrition/seafood-consumption/_documents/advisory-brochure.pdf

 

 11/19/2016 05:09 PM
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foam ball

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I'm not eating anything coming out of the lagoon or irl with all the water problems we are having. Not to mention most of the decent size fish are full of worms.
 11/21/2016 12:13 PM
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all3

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What local fish do you think is the safest? I'm thinking whiting and pompano from the surf. Probably the smaller mahi mahi and tunas would be good but it's tough to get out and get them that often.



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 11/23/2016 07:10 AM
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tom

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^In this case, size doesn't matter (haha!)

There's tons of good info on mercury here: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/tmdl/docs/tmdls/mercury/Mercury-TMDL.pdf

page 70 has actual levels, but to boil it down,

the higher on the food chain (trophic level) your fish is (even small ones)

the more mercury it contains

ie -

snook/tuna/shark = super high mercury

shrimp/mullet/tilapia = very little mercury

 12/02/2016 01:51 AM
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all3

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Size does matter, a small fish of one species will have less mercury than a large fish of the same species



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Old and Slow can be stylish if you eliminate the jerky part. Heading out into this beautiful world in search of wild waves, wonderful women, and my golf ball.

 12/02/2016 06:12 AM
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tom

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The danger of oversimplification - Guilty as charged!

Within species, size/age can be a good predictor of mercury content.

Between most species, trophic level is a good predictor of mercury content.  

Better?

 



Edited: 12/02/2016 at 06:28 AM by tom
 12/02/2016 06:18 PM
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all3

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I would like to see comparisions between something like a huge whale shark that's 50 years old and eats plankton and a 3ft blacktip shark.



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Old and Slow can be stylish if you eliminate the jerky part. Heading out into this beautiful world in search of wild waves, wonderful women, and my golf ball.

 12/03/2016 03:09 AM
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jime

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Tom, thanks for posting the link above. WOW! What a great report on lead in our fish/environment! I did "Control F" to look for pompano. Pg 70 - 73 shows lists of fishes we consume, including pomps on pg 71, and the amount of expected lead, Mean Hg (mg/kg) in them. I'm curious as to how pompano have such a relatively high number vs. sheepshead and red drum. Perhaps there's a lot of Hg in those sand fleas? But, in my fishing experience, the sheepshead eat quite a few fleas too.
Please see the article link Tom posted above for a more clear and accurate presentation of this data.

From table 7.2 of the article:

Amberjack 0.441
Blue crab 0.101
King mackerel 1.153
Mackerel 0.381
Marine catfish 0.422
Pompano 0.441
Red drum 0.196
Salad shrimp 0.016
Sheepshead 0.183
Snook 0.374
Whitefish 0.103
Largemouth bass 0.470
Lg Lobster tails 0.167
Shark 1.185
 12/03/2016 08:33 PM
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Cole

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Mercury in fish accrued from coal power plant waste.

If tuna comes from a remote place, why is it as high as local caught fish of the same species?

Have we just screwed up every inch of the planet?



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 12/05/2016 06:50 AM
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tom

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all3, 

I don't know that you'll find anything on whale shark but just for comparison of trophic differences from our IRL:

Manatees - fairly long lived herbivore, have been shown to have 0.5ug/g (dry wt.) mercury in liver tissue and non-detect in muscle

Dolphins - long lived top predator, have been shown to have 70(mean) to 200 (max) ug/g (wet wt.) mercury in liver and 5.7 (mean) to 42 (max) ug/g (wet wt.) in muscle.  

I don't have the actualy wet/dry values from these studies

but wet vs dry is around a 5 to 1 in tissue so the manatee values, if wet,

would be divided by 5.

watch your mercury content!

 

cole - atmospheric deposition, but you probably knew that already



Edited: 12/05/2016 at 07:53 AM by tom
 12/06/2016 10:16 AM
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all3

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Thanks Tom, that gives an indication for sure.



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Old and Slow can be stylish if you eliminate the jerky part. Heading out into this beautiful world in search of wild waves, wonderful women, and my golf ball.

 12/07/2016 10:53 AM
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gettingit

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what you guys think about the stone crabs?

 12/07/2016 11:44 AM
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all3

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Stone crab=epic!



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Old and Slow can be stylish if you eliminate the jerky part. Heading out into this beautiful world in search of wild waves, wonderful women, and my golf ball.

 12/08/2016 07:11 AM
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tom

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mmmmm stone crab

it's on page 70 of the link I posted above

more mercury than shrimp, less than trout

 12/10/2016 06:14 PM
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WG

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"Levels of highly toxic mercury contamination in Atlantic bluefin tuna are rapidly declining, according to a new study. That trend does not affect recommended limits on consumption of canned tuna, which comes mainly from other tuna species. Nor does it reflect trends in other ocean basins. But it does represent a major break in the long-standing, scary connection between tuna and mercury, a source of public concern since 1970, when a chemistry professor in New York City found excess levels of mercury in a can of tuna and spurred a nationwide recall. Tuna consumption continues to be the source of about 40 percent of the mercury contamination in the American diet. And mercury exposure from all sources remains an important issue, because it causes cognitive impairment in an estimated 300,000 to 600,000 babies born in this country each year.
The new study, published online on November 10 by Environmental Science & Technology, links the decline directly to reduced mercury emissions in North America. Most of that reduction has occurred because of the marketplace shift by power plants and industry away from coal, the major source of mercury emissions. Pollution control requirements imposed by the federal government have also cut mercury emissions.
Progress on both counts could, however, reverse, with President-elect Donald Trump promising a comeback for the U.S. coal industry, in part by clearing away such regulations."



https://www.scientificamerican...-shift-away-from-coal/
 12/10/2016 07:01 PM
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all3

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Thank you, WG



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Old and Slow can be stylish if you eliminate the jerky part. Heading out into this beautiful world in search of wild waves, wonderful women, and my golf ball.

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