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Topic Title: Ukio-e Heros
Topic Summary: Traditional Japanese print-making for the present day
Created On: 04/17/2018 02:02 AM
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 04/17/2018 02:02 AM
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ww

Posts: 14425
Joined Forum: 08/17/2007

Watched an interesting (if too-long) documentary on young Utah artist Jed Henry's collaboration with Tokyo printmaker David Bull (yes, he's English) to make old-style prints with present-day subjects.  Here's the sales website.  The documentary said there were only about 10 traditional printmakers (who cut the multiple wood blocks for the prints and use the traditional methods) left in Japan.  With success of the early prints, it looks like Jed Henry is now collaborating with two younger printmakers.    

As a Japanese expert pointed out in the documentary, when Japan went modern after about 1850, the paper prints that had been popular went out of favor and whole bundles were sold abroad.  Foreign collectors and museums did great work in saving some of this heritage.  Much of what had been in Tokyo burned either in the 1923 earthquake or the 1945 bombings.  I once visited the big Edo-Tokyo museum when they were holding a print exhibit from the Boston art museum.  It was a big deal.  



Edited: 04/17/2018 at 09:19 PM by ww
 04/23/2018 09:31 AM
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SAsurfer

Posts: 49
Joined Forum: 02/17/2013

Originally posted by: ww Watched an interesting (if too-long) documentary on young Utah artist Jed Henry's collaboration with Tokyo printmaker David Bull (yes, he's English) to make old-style prints with present-day subjects.  Here's the sales website.  The documentary said there were only about 10 traditional printmakers (who cut the multiple wood blocks for the prints and use the traditional methods) left in Japan.  With success of the early prints, it looks like Jed Henry is now collaborating with two younger printmakers.   

 

As a Japanese expert pointed out in the documentary, when Japan went modern after about 1850, the paper prints that had been popular went out of favor and whole bundles were sold abroad.  Foreign collectors and museums did great work in saving some of this heritage.  Much of what had been in Tokyo burned either in the 1923 earthquake or the 1945 bombings.  I once visited the big Edo-Tokyo museum when they were holding a print exhibit from the Boston art museum.  It was a big deal.  

 

A friend of mine here in Gainesville carves linoleum for her work. I'm not shilling for her, but I do like her work and have several pieces because its very Florida. Here's her website in case you're interested.

http://www.floridianastudios.com/

 04/23/2018 05:14 PM
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ww

Posts: 14425
Joined Forum: 08/17/2007

Linoleum printmaking (same technique as woodcuts) has been popular for a long time.  A more elaborate way to get color is to use paint-like "ink" in layers, first doing the most widespread color, then cutting away at the block and printing the second color, and so on.  This is a big, elaborate example.  I think it's just a single block that was recut and re-inked repeatedly.  Artist Edith Freeman of Billings, Montana.  Pasture II.  

freeman dandelions

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